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20121201
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. tavis: the last time we talked was on my radio program, and you took off to go to europe. i am at my house on line and a headline pops up that says marcus miller in fatal switzerland bus crash. i am at my house, and i screamed. i had just talked to you, i had seen you days prior. i could not believe you had died in a bus crash. the driver of the bus did die. what was going on in switzerland. >> we had just finished and monte carlo, the jazz festival. at the show, we had a long trek to holland. that is about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning. i am starting to come up, and i feel like it is vertigo. the impact causes the bus to fall on its side. from all the people here, crashing into people, it was pretty crazy. after a while, the rescue workers came and got us. the guy was like 23 years old, these guys that are amazingly talented. i was terrified. i thought it would prevent them from playing or whatever. ours is going from guide to die. let me see you move your lips. where is the other driver? he did not make it. it was horrible. in my situation, it is really difficult. i was glad that the o
in an economy like the uk or europe, you are done. now you have to spend the rest of your life in a depression because you are not used to dealing with the real world. what happens is he was -- he did not have a stable income. the risks were hidden from him. the taxi driver or the freelance person or anyone who has a variable in, is vastly more protected from adversity it than someone who has a very steady income. when i compared it to lead to saudi arabia or egypt before the arab spring -- italy to sell the radio or egypt before the arab spring, it is good in the long run to mitigate the black swan risk. tavis: what might he have done differently? >> if you were self-employed, he would've had skills to fix the market. he had one employer dependent on bad employer, permitted his position and now he does not have any skills. he could have done differently if he had changed jobs or changed skills. it is overall like a system -- small corporations have more variations and they're forced to adapt a faster. tavis: if you are watching this program right now and you are listening to this example and
that -- in the man's life, how did that challenge you, how did that shape europe? >> you never know how much you are leaning on someone until they die. utch, and i had to bite the bullet and pull up my bootstraps and start stepping. all the other guys in the band are wondering, what do we do now. everybody knew -- they did not know what the solution was, but they knew if we did not keep playing there was no telling what would happen. we were playing in 1970. i think we played 306 nights. people ask you all the time, how did you make it? how did you know when you made it. i am not sure what that is, but we just got around and played everywhere we could. we were in new orleans on saturday night. we would look for a park on sunday and go set up -- we had a collection of these extension cords. we would see if there were a couple of consuls who would let us plug in, and then we would have -- a couple of souls who would let us plug in, and we would have of them. tavis: you still love playing? >> yes, sir. tavis: you said a moment ago, i do not know what made it means. i assume you had to make it -- yo
i think has not really hit this country yet, but which we're beginning to go through in europe where we're realizing that unrestrained capitalism is a hiding to nowhere and it doesn't protect the population as it should and we have to completely start to re-evaluate how we use capitalism as an instrument for feeding and housing our population. tavis: yeah. there an increasing number of folk in this country who feel the same way, that now is a good time to start rethinking capitalism as we know it. but to even raise that conversation gets you labeled un-american in many circles, so i can imagine how difficult it must be to get off the ground. >> well, i'm not american, so i can be un-american. [laughter] tavis: [laughter] and you can come back on this program any time you want. >> all right, tavis. tavis: i'm delighted to have had you here. >> nice to see you. tavis: jeremy irons, one of the stars of the new project, "the words." good to have you here. we'll see you again soon, i hope. that's our show for tonight. you can download our new app in the itunes app store. i'll see you back
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4